Food System

How to Compost in Winter, Indoors or Outdoors

Jan 12th, 2016 | By Rebecca Louie

Don’t let Old Man Winter put the freeze on your composting efforts! He’ll try his best to thwart you by turning your piles to ice, slowing down microbes, shooing away composting crawlies, and stealing away the sun. Still, composters with a fire for recycling food scraps can melt through any Polar Vortex, Arctic Assault or plain ol’ cold snap to make sure the job gets done. Here are a few tips and strategies for making winter composting a success from Rebecca Louie, author of Compost City.
Continue Reading


Eco Living

How to Compost at Work

Mar 24th, 2015 | By Katy Franklin

Although the concept of a lunch hour has changed in recent decades, millions of Americans still eat in the workplace nearly every day. That means that millions of sandwich crusts, banana peels and coffee grounds (lots of coffee grounds) get tossed out in the office garbage. Although many employers and corporate office buildings in America have implemented successful workplace recycling programs, few can say the same about composting programs. Here's a look at how we started an office composting system, and you can too!
Continue Reading


Eco Living

Compost Q&A: Troubleshooting the Worm Bin

Jul 7th, 2014 | By Jen Wendeln

Since we started this blog in 2012, our most popular post of all time has been "How to Compost in Your Apartment," an infographic that breaks down how to start a vermicomposting bin. Since then, we’ve heard from a few beginners who’ve had some questions about their worm bins. So we gathered them in one place and went to an expert for help. Here’s how she troubleshoots a few common vermicomposting challenges, like smells, fruit flies, escaping worms and more.
Continue Reading


Subscribe to our Newsletter

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Food System

'I Want to Compost, but...'

Jun 3rd, 2014 | By Jen Wendeln

A recent study found that 67% of Americans would be willing to compost food waste if it was more convenient to do so. Since convenience means different things to different people, we thought we’d address a few common questions and issues that serve as barriers to composting at home. Hopefully some of these answers will help you find a solution that works for you.
Continue Reading


Food System

Bokashi

Sep 21st, 2012 | By Aubrey Yee

Most compost systems can't take meat and dairy. Bokashi can take it all! And with an airtight bin, it's perfect for apartments or indoor composting. No smell and no pests...
Continue Reading


Eco Living

How To Compost In Your Apartment

Sep 17th, 2012 | By Nicole Rogers

As part of our series on composting, we offer this handy illustrated guide to composting in your apartment. If you have been thinking you might be interested in taking the plunge into composting, read on and have fun! Our guide gives you all of the tools you need to get started. Composting can be a rewarding experience in efficiency and self-reliance. Waste not, want not!
Continue Reading


Eco Living

A Love Affair With Worms

May 27th, 2012 | By Aubrey Yee

What is Vermicomposting?

It almost sounds like a foreign word, but vermicomposting is the process of using worms to compost food waste into a rich, black humus. The “humus” is actually a compost of the worm castings (castings is a fancy way of saying: worm poop!)

The worms eat the food scraps, paper, etc that you put into your bin and their excrement is a rich, black, dirt-like compost that your plants will absolutely love! (and it has no smell, it really looks and feels like dirt, so don’t worry!)

To get started you need:

  • Worm Bin
  • Worms - make sure you get the right kind of Redworms - not all worms are alike!
  • Paper and food scraps to compost!

If you choose to buy a worm bin, there are a few different styles to choose from.

There are also several websites that will help you build your own worm bin.

Once you have the bin and the worms, you’ll want to prep it for success. The worms like paper including your junk mail minus the plastic parts. They eat most food waste as well with the exception of  dairy, meats and citrus (although citrus is ok in small amounts).

The first time you put the worms in the bin make sure you have a good mix of paper and food waste. The shredded up paper/newspaper/old magazines/cardboard is called “bedding” and you’ll need a good layer of bedding to start your bin off. Make sure you shred it well so the worms can move around and through the bedding. Spray a little water on the bedding to get it damp.

You’ll want to add some of these paper products every so often so the inside of the bin doesn’t get too wet. The heat inside the bin creates water vapor and your worms can drown in too much water!

Most bins will have a valve to drain excess water. The water is actually called “worm tea”. This brown “tea” is also great for your plants or your garden.

Expect to harvest your worm castings every few months. All you need to do is keep feeding your worms. The amount of worms you’ll need depends on how much kitchen waste you produce each day. Start with one pound of worms for a typical family of four and add more if they aren’t eating the food fast enough.

It helps to chop or cut up the food and paper waste before putting it in your bin. The worms will be able to eat it faster.

The worms will keep reproducing and if a couple escape into your soil it’s good for the whole ecosystem so don’t worry! The great thing about worm bins is they don’t smell - as long as you follow the rules and don’t put in any dairy or meat. It’s a great way to up-cycle almost all your food waste. And when you put the compost back into your garden to grow more food, you’ve created a closed-loop, truly sustainable food system.


Continue Reading